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Don's Rail Photos

Australian Trams

Brisbane City Council

Horse car service began in 1885 and conversion to electric power began in 1897. In 1923, the separate companies were brought together as the Brisbane Tramways Trust, but in 1925 the Brisbane City Council took over. The properties were improved at that time and the system continued to be expanded to a peak in 1952 of 199 km of track mileage. On September 28, 1962, a fire at the Paddington Tram Depot destroyed 65 cars. Older cars were put back into service and 8 cars were rebuilt from salvage, but route closures began in earnest. The final cars ran in April 1969.

43 was an advertising car.

47 was a combination car was built in 1901.  It is at the Brisbane Tramway Museum.

48.

53.

63.

65 was built by Brisbane Tramway Co in 1921.  It is at the Brisbane Tramway Museum

71 was built by Brisbane Tramways Co in 1921.  It is at the Sydney Tramway Museum

75 was a 10 bench toast-rack built in 1921.

99 was rebuilt on a frame from a retired car in 1945.  It is at the Brisbane Tramway Museum.

133 is at the Wellington Tramway Museum.

136 is at the Brisbane Tramway Museum.

180 is at the Sydney Tramway Musem.

231 is at the Brisbane Tramway Museum.

236 is at the Ferrymead Museum.

277 is at the Brisbane Tramway Museum.

295 is at the Sydney Tramway Museum.

300 is at the Brisbane Tramway Museum.

309 was a dropcentre car which had been built with hand brakes, but which was upgraded with air brakes at a later date. This series of cars was originated in 1925.

341 was built by BCC in 1936.  It is at the Brisbane Tramway Museum.

386 is at the Brisbane Tramway Museum.

400 was built by BCC in 1938.  It is at the Brisbane Tramway Museum.

423.

429 was built by BCC in 1942.  It is at the Brisbane Tramways Museum.

470.

480 is at the Brisbane Tramway Museum.

494 is at the Brisbane Tramway Museum.

499 is at the Old Canberra Tram Co.

505.

512.

533.

535.

548 was built by BCC in 1964.  It is at Sydney Tramway Museum.

550 was built by BCC in 1964.  It is at the Whiteman Park Tramway Museum.

554 was built by BCC in 1964.  It was retired in 1969 and at the Brisbane Tram Museum.  It was the last car built and the last car run on the line.

Milton Road repair shops.


Hawthorn Tramways Trust

8 was built by Duncan & Fraser in 1916.  It became Melbourne & Metropolitan Tramways Board 114, Class M, in 1920.  It was sold as Electric Supply Co 3 in 1930 and retired in 1956.  It was donated to Australian Electric Traction Assn and transferred to Tramway Museum Society in 1962.  It was restored as HT 8 in 1992.

32 was built by Duncan & Fraser in 1917. In 1920 it became M&MTB 138, Class P. It was reclassified Class C in 1928. In 1945 it was sold to SECV and numbered 24. In 1975 it was restored as M&MTB 138 and restored as HTT 32 at Hawthorn in 2008.


Hobart Municipal Tramways

This line opened in 1893 and closed in 1960. The use of bow trolleys was unusual in Australia. I have no other information.

5.

108.

122.

125.

142 was built in 1952 and was the newest car on the system.


Launceston Municipal Tramways

This line opened in 1911 and closed in 1952.

14 was built by J&T Gunn of Launceston in 1912.

22 was a later design.


Melbourne & Metropolitan Tramways Board

We have a full page.


Melbourne, Brunswick & Coburg Tramways Trust

11 was built by Duncan and Fraser in 1916.  It was went to Melbourne & Metropolitan Trams Board as 164, Class S, in 1928.  It was retired in March 1953 and saved by Tramway Museum of Victoria.

16 was built by Duncan & Fraser in 1917.  It became M&MTB 180, Class S, in 1928 and rebuilt in April 1959 as a grinder.  It was retired in April 1966 and restored for Tramway Museum of Victoria.

.


Municipal Tramways Trust

TransAdelaide

Adelaide Metro

The earliest service in Adelaide was a steam suburban line to Glenelg opening in 1873. Horse trams began operating in 1878. The MTT was formed in 1906 to operate all tram lines in Adelaide. Electrification began in 1909. In 1929 the Glenelg railway was purchased and electrified. In 1935 all tram service in Port Adelaide was ended. In 1958 all tram service in Adelaide ended except for the Glenelg line which is still in operation using the original cars. In 1994 TransAdelaide took over the MTT.

42, Class B, was built by Brill-Pengelley in 1909. It was rebuilt in 1917 to Class A2 and restored as Class B.

111, Class E1, was built by Brill-Pengelley in 1910 as Class E. It was rebuilt in 1936 as Class E1 and retired in 1958. It is now preserved at the Australian Electric Transport Museum.

117, Class E1, was built by Brill-Pengelley in 1910 as Class E. It was rebuilt in 1936 as Class E1 and retired in 1958.

118, Class E, was built by Brill-Pengelley in 1910.  It was rebuilt in 1936 as Class E1 and retired in 1958.  It is now under restoration at AETM.

192, Class D, was built by Duncan & Fraser in 1912, as Prahran & Malvern Tramways Trust 24. It became Hawthorne Tramways Trust 24 in August 1916 and it then became Melbourne & Metropolitan Tramways Trust 130, Class O, in 1921. It was sold to MTT as 192, Class D, in January 1927, and is preserved at the Australian Electric Transport Museum.

223, Class F, was built by Pengelley in 1922 and retired in 1958.

232, Class F, was built by Pengelley in 1922 and retired in 1958.

264, Class F1, was built by Pengelley in 1925 and retired in 1958.

303, Class G, was built by Brill in 1925. In 1936 it was sold to State Electricity Commission of Victoria as 27 in Geelong and was later transferred to Bendigo in 1947. It is now restored as MTT 303 at the Australian Electric Transport Museum.

358, Class H, was built by Pengelley in 1929.

363, Class H, was built by Pengelley in 1929.

368, Class H, was built by Pengelley in 1929.

369, Class H, was built by Pengelley in 1929. Pantagraphs replaced trolley poles in 1986.

372, Class H, was built by Pengelley in 1929.

373, Class H, was built by Pengelley in 1929.

375, Class H, was built by Pengelley in 1929.

377, Class H, was built by Pengelley in 1929. The cars were painted in the city car scheme during the 1960s and 1970s.

379, Class H, was built by Pengelley in 1929.

381, Class H1, was built by J A Lawton & Sons in 1952.

202, Class 200, Citadis 302, was built by Alstom in 2008 as Metro Ligero de Madrid 166.  It was not delivered but sold to Adelaide and remodeled at Preston as 202.

S.1. was built by Pengelley.


New South Wales Government Tramways

Tram service began in Sydney with horse drawn cars in 1861. Steam operation of tram lines began in 1879. Cable cars were used on some of the more hilly lines. Electrification began in 1898 and was completed except for one steam line by 1910. The last steam tram ran until 1943. At one time Sydney had the largest system in Australia, but abandonment began in 1939 and was completed in 1961.

105, Class W, was a water car.

112 and 134, Class S, were scrubber cars.

721. Class N, was built in 1906 and retired in 1949.

763, Class K, was built by Meadowbrook Mfg in 1908. It was rebuilt as scrubber 138S in 1952 and sold to Melbourne & Metropolitan Tramways Board in August 1959. It went into service n December 1959 as 10 and was renumbered 10W in November 1975. It was modernized in June 1979 and retired in 2002.

797, Class K, was built by Meadowbrook Mfg in 1908.  It was rebuilt as scrubber 139S in 1953 and sold to M&MTB in August 1959.  It went into service in April 1960 as 11 and was renumbered 11W in November 1975.  It was modernized in February 1980.

Class O cars were built between 1908 and 1914. 1187 was built by Meadowbank in 1912 and is now at the Oregon Electric Ry Assn.

1573, Class P/R1, was built by Meadowbank in 1923 as Class P and was rebuilt as Class R1 in 1949. It is now preserved at the Sydney Tramways Museum.

1740, Class R, was built in 1933 and is now preserved at the Sydney Tramways Museum.

1753, Class R, was assisted on Darling Street by a counterbalance car.

1890, Class R, was temporarily in marine service.

1925, Class R, was built in 1935 and had a special paint scheme for the visit of the Queen.

1980, Class R1.

2000, Class R1, also tried to become amphibious at one point.


North Melbourne Electric Tramway & Lighting Co.

13 was built by Brill Car in 1906 and assembled by Duncan & Fraser.  It became Melbourne & Metropolitan Tramways Board as 214, Class V, in 1921 and rebuilt as 2A, a freight car, in 1927.  It was renumbered 17 in 1934 and renumbered 17W in April 1976.  It was fitted with advertising panels in 1956 and retired in October 1977.  It was restored as 214, Class V, in 1978, and restored as NMETL 13 in March 2008.


Prahran & Malvern Tramways Trust

1 was built by Duncan & Fraser on 1910. It became Melbourne & Metropolitan Tramways Board 1, Class A, in 1921 and was retired in 1931. The body was sold and became part of a home at Ferry Creek, Victoria.

41 was built by Duncan & Fraser in 1914. In 1921 it became M&MTB 41, Class E, and was reclassified Class C in 1928. In 1951 it was sold to State Electricity Commission of Victoria as 38.

42 was built by Duncan & Fraser in 1914. In 1921 it became M&MTB 42, Class E, and was reclassified Class C in 1928. In 1951 it was sold to SECV as 39. It was retired in 1971 and sold to the Lismore Lions Club for local display. In 1976 it was returned to Ballarat and is now used as a souvenier center.

63 was built by Duncan & Fraser in 1913. In 1922 it became M&MTB 63, Class H, and was reclassified Class A in 1928. IIn 1931 it was sold to Electric Supply Co and renumbered 18. It was rebuilt in 1936 and sent to Sevastapol for display in 1971. It was transferred to the BTM in 1983 and is in regular service.

73 was built by Duncan & Fraser in 1913. In 1922 it became M&MTB 73, Class J, and was reclassified Class A in 1928. In 1931 it was sold to ESC and numbered 17. It is now preserved at the Tramway Museum of Victoria.


Rockhampton Council Tramways

Steam Tram was built by Valentin Purrey in 1909.  It was retired in 1939 and restored from 1976 to 1988.


State Electricity Commision of Victoria

Electric Supply Co.

This system consisted of lines in three cities, Bendigo, Ballarat, and Geelong.

Bendigo opened electric service in 1903 by Electric Supply Co as a means of marketing their electricity. It was taken over by the State Electricity Commission in 1934 and closed service in 1972. Most of the system was purchased by the local trust and one of the two lines is now being operated as a heritage line.

3 was built by Duncan & Fraser in 1916 as Hawthorn Tramways Trust 8.  It became Melbourne & Metropolitan Tramways Board 114, Class M, in 1920.  It was sold as Electric Supply Co 3 in 1930 and retired in 1956.  It was donated to Australian Electric Traction Assn and transferred to Tramway Museum Society in 1962.  It was restored as HTT 8 in 1992.

15 was built by Brill in December 1923, #21863.  It was assigned to Geelong and transferred to Bendigo in 1948 and used in the heritage service.

17 was built by Duncan & Fraser in 1913 as an open car ("toastrack") for ESCo. In 1953 it was closed in and operated as a scrubber car. In 1975 restoration began to return it to the original configuration.

24 was built by Duncan & Fraser in 1917 as HTT 32. In 1920 it became M&MTB 138, Class P. It was reclassified Class C in 1928. In 1945 it was sold to SECV and numbered 24. In 1975 it was restored as M&MTB 138 and restored as HTT 32 at Hawthorn in 2008.

25 was built by Duncan & Fraser in 1917 as HTT 27. In 1922 it became M&MTB 133, Class P. It was reclassified Class C in 1928. In 1947 it was sold to SECV and numbered 25. In 1972 it became Bendigo Tramways Trust 25.

26 was built by Duncan & Fraser in 1917 as HTT 29. In 1922 it became M&MTB 135, Class P. It was reclassified Class C in 1928. In 1947 it was sold to SECV and became 26.

27 was built by Brill in 1925 as Municipal Tramways Trust 303, Class G. In 1936 it was sold to SECV as 27 in Geelong and was later transferred to Bendigo in 1947. It is now restored as MTT 303 at the Australian Electric Transport Museum.

28 was built by Brill in 1925 as MTT 304, Class G. In 1936 it was sold to SECV as 28 in Geelong. It was transferred to Bendigo in 1947 and was repainted and lettered Bendigo Trust in 1947.

29 was built by Brill in 1925 as MTT 302, Class G. In 1936 it was sold to SECV as 29 in Geelong. It was transferred to Bendigo in 1947 and was restored as MTT 302 in 1981.

30 was built by Brill in 1925 as MTT 301, Class G. In 1936 it was sold to SECV as 30 in Geelong. It was transferred to Bendigo and 1947 and became Bendigo Trust 30 in 1972.

32 was built by Duncan & Fraser in 1916 as HTT 16. It became M&MTB 122, Class N, in 1922, and Class C in 1928. In January 1948 it became SECV 32 in Geelong. In 1956 it was transferred to Bendigo and renumbered 3. It has been restored as M&MTB 122.

34 was built by Duncan & Fraser in 1916 as HTT 20. It became M&MTT 126, Class N, in 1922, and was reclassified Class C in 1928. In January 1948 it became SECV 34 in Geelong. In 1956 it was transferred to Bendigo and renumbered 2. It is currently in storage pending restoration as HTT 20.

 

Ballarat began with horse cars in 1887. It was electrified by Electric Supply Co in 1905. It was taken over by SECV in 1934 and closed service in 1971. 10 cars were transferred to the Ballarat Tramway Museum and other cars have been added since.

1 was built by Duncan & Fraser in 1887 as a double-deck horse tram for Ballarat Tramway. After electrification in 1905 it was used as a trailer behind electric cars until the late 1920s. The body became a residential outbuilding until it was rescued and restored in 1985.

17 was built by Duncan & Fraser in 1913 as Prahran & Malvern Tramways Trust 73. In 1922 it became M&MTB 73, Class J, and was reclassified Class A in 1928. In 1931 it was sold to ESC and numbered 17. It is now preserved at the Tramway Museum of Victoria.

18 was built by Duncan & Fraser in 1913 as P&MTT 63. In 1922 it became M&MTB 63, Class H, and was reclassified Class A in 1928. In 1931 it was sold to ESC and renumbered 18. It was rebuilt in 1936 and sent to Sevastapol for display in 1971. It was transferred to the BTM in 1983 and is in regular service.

26 was built by Duncan & Fraser in 1916 as HTT 5. In 1922 it became M&MTB 111, Class M, and was reclassified Class A in 1928. In 1930 it was sold to ESC and renumbered 26. It was rebuilt in 1936 as a closed car and restored to California configuration in 1978.

38 was built by Duncan & Fraser in 1914 as P&MTT 41. In 1921 it became M&MTB 41, Class E, and was reclassified Class C in 1928. In 1951 it was sold to SECV as 38.

39 was built by Duncan & Fraser in 1914 as P&MTT 42. In 1921 it became M&MTB 42, Class E, and was reclassified Class C in 1928. In 1951 it was sold to SECV as 39. It was retired in 1971 and sold to the Lismore Lions Club for local display. In 1976 it was returned to Ballarat and is now used as a souvenier center.


Victorian Railways

The railroad system serving Victoria was required to initiate tram service in 1906 at St. Kilda and extended in 1919 and 1926. It closed in 1959. For a complete history, see the page by David Brown.

51 was built at the Newport Shops in the 1920s and was converted for 1 man operation in 1934. The body is at Marysville, Vic.


Yarra Trams

Included in Melbourne & Metropolitan Tranways Board

 

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