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Don's Rail Photos

United States Army

Steam Locomotives

In June, 1952, I arrived at Fort Eustis, VA, for my basic training. Here was a wonderful steam and diesel powered railroad, but steam was the primary power. I stayed until the end of the year when I shipped out to Korea. I returned twice for reserve training in 1956 and 1957.  I want to thank Brian Rumary, who provided additional information from England, and to Steve Holding, who also added information.

1 was a narrow gauge locomotive used on the South Jetty at the Galveston Bay.

1 was built by Cooke in 1901 as Texas & Pacific 285, Class D-9.  It was sold on December 6, 1941, as Claiborne & Polk Ry 1.

61 was built by Richmond in 1903 as Chesapeake & Ohio 476, Class G-7s. It was renumbered 983 in 1926. The army bought it and made it a target. Apparently the number was changed after each session.

100 was built in 1942 and was used to provide steam for the winches at the stevedore training site.

101 was built by Baldwin in December 1929, #61159, as Charles R McCormick Lumber Co 101.  It was sold as USA 101 in 1938 and sold as Comox Logging & RR Co 18 in 1944.  It was sold to West Coast Railway Association in July 1964.

190 was built by Baldwin in February 1943, #69245.  It was sold as White Pass & Yukon RR 190 in 1946 and sold as Tweetsie RR 190 in 1960.

396 was built by Baldwin in November 1917, #47032. It was renumbered 645 in 1919 and in 1941 it was renumbered 20 of the Claiborne & Polk Training Ry. After WWII, it was sold to S. Bender in March 1947 and resold as Tremont & Gulf 28. It was sold as Temple Lumber Co 28 in June 1955 and merged as Southern Pine Lumber Co 28 in 1956.  SPL donated the locomotive in 1973 and it was moved to the Texas State RR in February 1976.  It became 300 when rebuilt.

520 was built by Baldwin and appears to be in France.

717 was built by H K Porter in July 1942, #7376.  It was sold as General American Transportation Co 717 and later sold to Goldberg Co.  It was sold to Jack Shroyer in 1966 and sold to Jerry Jacobson.  It was sold to Art Davis as ADRX 717 in 1983 and sold as Bluegrass Railroad Museum 717 in 1989.  It was sold to a collector in California in 2003.

8341 was built by Baldwin in May 1918, #48714.  It was renumbered 6779 and became Korean National RR CS2-101 in 1946.  It was painted in the 1950s for U S Army 765 in honor of the shop battalion in Pusan.  It was given from Korea to the museum at Green Bay, WI, in 1959.

600 was built by Alco-Schenectady in December, 1908, #45772, as Ann Arbor RR 150 Class G. In 1925 it was renumbered 2170, Class I-6. It was acquired by the Army in July, 1951, and was apparently scrapped.

601 was built by Alco-Schenectady in December 1902, #45773, as AA  151, Class G. In 1925 it was renumbered 2171, Class I-6. It was acquired by the Army in July 1951 and was scrapped. It is highly unlikely it was ever used.

602 was built by Alco-Schenectady in December 1902, #45774, as AA 152, Class G. In 1925 it was renumbered 2172, Class I-6. It was acquired by the Army in July 1951 and was scrapped. It is highly unlikely it was ever used.

610 was built by Baldwin-Lima-Hamilton in November 1952, #75503. It is now in operation at the Tennessee Valley Railway Museum.

633 was built by Alco-Schenectady in June 1945, #73074, as United States Navy 65-00459.  It was meter gauge and rebuilt by Davenport to 42" gauge.  It became US 633 in March 1952 and sold in 1956.

634 was built by Alco-Schenectady in June 1945, #73075, as USN 65-00460.  It was meter gauge and rebuilt by Davenport to 42" gauge.  It became US 634 in March 1952 and sold in 1956.

1702 was built by Baldwin in September 1942, #64641.  It was purchased by Warren & Saline River RR in 1946 and was sold to Reader RR as 1702 in 1964.  It was then sold to Fremont & Elkhorn Valley RR as 1702 in August 1985 and then to Great Smoky Mountains RR as 1702.

2326 was built by Baldwin in 1943.  It was sold as Korean National RR CS2-29 in 1947

2339 was built by Baldwin in 1943.  It was sold as KNR CS2-31 in 1947

2571 was built by Lima in 1943.  It was sold as KNR CS2-41 in 1947.

2628 was built by Baldwin in June, 1943, #69856. It was rebuilt with rotary poppet valve gear and was renumbered 611 in 1954. I last saw it at Rusk, TX, on the Texas State RR, but it was traded to the TVRM for cars.

2630 was built by Baldwin in August, 1943, #69858. It was renumbered 612 in 1954 and sent to the Cass Scenic RR in June 1972.  It was sold in 2010.

2677 was built by Baldwin in August 1943, #69855.  It became  Alaska RR  556 in 1945 and was donated to City of Anchorage in July 1957.

2863 was built by Alco in August 1943.  It was sold as KNR CS-51 in 1947.

2885 was built built by Alco 1943.  It was sold as KNR CS-52 in 1947.

3523 was built by Baldwin in December 1944, #70490. It came to Alaska in 1945 as 557, and it was retired in June 1963. It was sold to Michaelson Steel & Supply Co in 1964 and became Mon-Road RR 557 in 1965. After Monte Holm passed away, it was sold to Vic Jansen and donated to Engine 557 Restoration Company in 2011.  It was shipped back to Anchorage and is be restored for service.

4002 was built by Alco-Schenectady in September 1942, #70428. It was sold to Brown Paper Mill Co in West Monroe, LA, as 5. It became OMC 5 in 1955 and in 1970 it was sold to the Cherokee & Southwestern. It later was sold to Lone Star Steel Co. and was in storage at their plant until moved back to Louisiana to a private museum near Baton Rouge.

4003 was built by Schenectady in September, 1942, #70429. It was renumbered 613 in 1954 and scrapped in 1966.

4018 was built by Schenectady in October, 1942, #70394. It was renumbered 614 in 1954.  It was planned to display it at Fort Eustis, but it is not on the list at the museum.

4021 was built by Schenectady in October, 1942, #70397. It was renumbered 615 in 1954 and the disposition is unknown.

4023 was built by Schenectady in October, 1942, #70402. It was renumbered 616 in 1954 and was sold to the Virginia Blue Ridge Ry as 9 on August 15, 1958. In 1967 it became New Hope & Ivyland 9.

4032 was built by Schenectady in November, 1942, #70414.  It was renumbered 617 in 1954.

4038 was built by Schenectady in November, 1942, #70420. It was renumbered 618 in 1954 and sold to VBR as 8 of August 15, 1958. It later became Delaware-Otsego RR 2 and later Cooperstown & Charlotte Valley 2.

4039 was built by Schenectady in November 1942, #70421.  It was sold to VBR as 5 on February 17, 1947.  It was then sold to Morris County Central 4039 in 1966.

5050 was built by H K Porter in July 1943, #7593.  It was sold as Georgia Power Co 97 and donated to Atlanta Chapter National Railway Historical Society in March 1965.

5155 was built by Lima in 1945.  It was sold as KNR CS2-74 in 1947.

5169 was built by Lima in 1945.  It was sold as KNR CS-77 in 1947.

5172 was built by Lima in 1945.  It was sold as KNR CS2-79 in 1947.

5187 was built by Lima in June, 1945, #8846. It is was renumbered 607 in 1951 and now on display at the Fort Eustis Transportation Museum.

5255 was built by Davenport in 1933, #1710.  It was used at Hawaii when it was still a territory and later transferred to Fort Benning, GA..

5714 was built by Lima in 1944.  It was sold as KNR CS2-83 in 1947.

5846 was built by Lima in April, 1945, #8784.  It was renumbered 606 in 1951 and was retired in 1969. It was donated to Falling Springs Station, Clifton Forge, VA in 1971 and later donated to Allegheny Central Scenic RR but never used.  It was then given to Crewe Railroad Museum and cosmetically restored as Norfolk & Western 606.

5855 was built by Lima in 1945.  It was sold as KNR CS2-85 in 1947.

5956 was built by Lima in 1945.  It was sold as KNR CS2-86 in 1947.

6062 was built by Baldwin in January 1945.  It was sold as KNR CS2-95 in 1947.

6063 was built by Baldwin in January 1945.  It was sold as KNR CS2-96 in 1947.

6068 was built by Baldwin in January 1945.  It was sold as KNR CS2-93 in 1947.

6814 was built by Baldwin in 1920, #43344, as Sierra RR 20. It was later sold to the USA as 6814 and later to Kurth Lumber Co as 20. The mill burned in 1959.

6996 was built by Lima in February 1942, #7877, and became Alaska RR 504 in 1946. It was later renumbered 404, and then became Ferrocarrilles Langreo 404 in January 1958.

6997 was built by Lima in February, 1942, #7878. It was renumbered 620 in 1954 and scrapped in Newport News, VA, in 1966.

Prior to WWII, the railroads were operated by the Quartermaster Corps. Also, airplanes were flown by the Army Air Corps before the Air Force was set up as a separate service. Here is 7031, which looks like a Vulcan, at work with an audience of future railfans.

The 9400s were built in 1950 in Japan for service in Korea. They were almost duplicates of the Korean National MK-1 class which dated back to the middle 1930s. The 9418 was built by Mihara and the others which I photographed were Kawasakis. Many were never used, and they were scrapped in the 1960s.

10136 was on display at Ft. Eustis when I got there in 1952, but it was gone when I got back in 1955. Ewald Rasch tells us 10136 is (was) a German class HF110C built for the military railroads (HeeresFeldbahn) with 110 hp and 3 driving axles, C being the third letter in the alphabet. They had an outside frame and thus could be used on 750 mm gauge and 600 mm gauge by changing the axles. They were used during the war in Russia. The last survivors ended their lives on the narrow gauge line on the island Ruegen in the East Sea. Luckily a few are still in use on museum railroads.

 

V-1923 is a narrow gauge locomotive built by Vulcan in January 1946, #4770. It is now on display at Ft. Eustis.

A day or two after I arrived at Ft. Eustis, we were loaded on a truck and taken out into the woods to do brush cutting. As we passed Rifle Range Junction, I saw two German locomotives and a motor train. When I got back at week end, the streamlined 4-8-4 was scrapped, but the L52-KON Kreigsloco and the motor train were still there. They were gone shortly afterwards. Look at that huge condensing tender. The L52-KON was a simplified variant derived from the standard freight type class 50 according to Ewald.

I have recently found out that the 2-8-2 was a real rare item. It was actually a V-8 locomotive. The cylinders were in a V formation on the axles, and it was expected this locomotive would break all speed records. It was experimental, and here is a photo of it in better days courtesy of James D. Hefner.

 

There is a special page on USA narrow gauge locomotives in Korea.

There was a model Korean Class PC-1 built by apprentices at the Yongdong Po shop of Chosen Rys. That was the name while the system was under Japanese control. The 712th Bn, Ry Opn, found it and had the concrete stand built for it in front of the Battalion Headquarters.  It later went to the Railroad Museum and some how got numbered 4288.  How about the elephant ears?

 

Thanks to John Goldie for info on Hawaii.

 

 

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